In 2015 we also began an Award in New York City to recognize young talent there.  Awards were supported by Lenovo, Monster, WowWee and B&H Photo.  That first year we awarded ten scholarships. The winners were:

Sara Sakowitz, a 19-year-old student at Columbia University, who created a startup called Blue Moon Box, which delivers a science experiment to subscribers each month. Sakowitz launched the company to encourage children, especially girls, to feel more comfortable with science.

Rachel Hosein, 17 of Brooklyn College who, after suffering seizures herself, constructed a hat lined with electrodes that nestle in an individual’s hair and scalp. The electrodes are part of a mobile EEG system that measures brain activity, which connects to a smartphone app that can message a user when they need to take medication and prepare for a seizure.

Dylan Kirdahy, 17, of Staten Island Technical High School, who invented a USB device that can autofill passwords after verifying the user with fingerprint recognition;

Alyssa Kapasi, 14, of the Brearley School, who created a robot that can lift objects of almost any shape;

Daniil Frants, 16, of Manhattan’s Dwight School, who created a wearable device that displays live closed captioning for those with hearing disabilities;

Mamadou Diallo, 16, and his classmates at the A. Philip Randolph Campus High School who lead “The Young Hackers,” a student-organized group that puts together hackathons across the city;

Jake Varghese, 16, of Bayside High School in Queens, who developed an app with videos that help users learn new languages;

Rebecca West, 17, of Townsend Harris in Queens developed a card game called “Pedestrian Penguin” that teaches children transportation safety;

And the youngest winner, 14-year-old Shemar Dacosta at the Bronx Academy for Software Engineering, developed an app called “Voices” that lets students anonymously submit problems they are dealing with at school.

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